What are the Causes of Tooth Sensitivity

causes of tooth sensitivity

Pain or discomfort in your one or more teeth stimulated by hot, cold, sour foods, especially the cold drinks or sometimes even by inhaling cold air, is called teeth sensitivity. The extent of pain in the teeth may depend upon the stage of your disease. The pain can be severe, sudden, and can reach into the nerve ending of your teeth.

What causes sensitive teeth?

Tooth sensitivity is caused due to:

  • Vigorous tooth brushing
  • Tooth enamel
  • Tooth grinding
  • Tooth bleaching
  • A cracked tooth or filling
  • Gum recession
  • Gum disease

Brushing too hard and too frequently and the use of abrasive toothpaste expose the underlying layer (the dentine) of your teeth by removing your gum tissues. The loss of tooth’s hard enamel causes thousands of tiny tubules leading to the tooth’s nerve center (the pulp). The tubules then provide space to hot, cold, or sweet foods to enter your teeth’s nerve, causing teeth sensitiveness.

Tooth grinding or compressing also removes tooth enamel exposing the underlying dentine. Also, the use of different tooth whitening toothpaste is a significant cause for sensitive teeth. Tooth cavities and fillings make your teeth susceptible by letting the food particles get into the spaces.

In some cases, periodontal diseases cause your gums to leave the teeth, and thus, the tooth surface becomes exposed. The exposed surface lets the food particles (hot, cold, sour, sweet) enter the cavities or roots, causing the pain.

Although some simple precautionary measures will help you protect your teeth against sensitivity if once you have caught into this dental issue, then set an appointment with your dentist in Los Angeles. The expert dental surgeon here will provide you the proper treatment depending upon the type and severity of your teeth diseases.

The experienced dentists will suggest you maintain good oral hygiene. It will also provide you proper cure keeping your satisfaction and comfort as the priority. In conclusion, appropriate brushing routine and flossing techniques don’t leave any food particles in your teeth and mouth and hence keeping your teeth away from sensitivity.

One Comment

  1. […] to choose from, but the type of brush you should want depends upon your teeth state. If you have sensitive gums and teeth, use a soft-bristled brush. On the other hand, if you have severe plaque, choose a hard-bristled […]

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